i—-i:

gods-save-anonymous:

kaitlynthevegan:

finallyfriendless:

aarbearrawr:

gods-save-anonymous:

What kind of computer or cell phone do YOU use that doesn’t involve poor working conditions, long hours, child labor, and sweatshops?

Assuming you are not vegan, you tell me what cruelty free computer and cell phone manufacturers you use, and I would be glad to support them.

Pointing out an uncontrollable by-product of capitalism does not mean that people that strive to cause less harm are in the wrong. In fact, a very large portion of vegans do everything in their power to support companies that do NOT fund/support aforementioned atrocities. Some things are unavoidable, but many activists do their best to shed light on the fact that these things are going on in an effort to change them. What are you doing? Using the same products as vegans, using products that are confirmed to exploit children, using products that are tested on animals, as well as eating them.

So, not everyone is perfect. The only result of you attempting to point out imperfections in vegans is that you end up pointing MASSIVE imperfections in yourself, because you are doing far less to try and end injustices for animals AND humans.

^ Perfek.

I will never understand why people go out of their way to try to make people who are trying to make a difference feel bad. What does it achieve? Nothing. It just makes you look like an asshat.

As previously mentioned, most Vegans (if they are Vegan for ethical reasons, I can’t speak for others) would go for completely cruelty-free companies if they knew of them. All the Vegans I know do that already. Point one out to us and we’ll swarm around it like it’s our God.

We’re doing everything in our power to be less asshole-ish. Can the same be said for you?

The original post was a response to white Pagans saying that even though reservation vegetables are ridiculously expensive (read: 5 dollars for a single cucumber), and that there are food deserts out there, that you can’t be a feminist without being a vegan. This was in response to vegans saying WE had to be perfect in their eyes to be feminists.

So yeah, fuck all of what you said, because it wasn’t about you.

When you make a post with “Helloooo, vegans!”, obviously Vegans are going to respond.

If you didn’t want that to happen you should have specified who the post was directed at/why you were posting that.

You know what I don’t understand? How is buying electronics the same as buying meat/fur/dairy? Why are you drawing comparisons between human exploitation and animal exploitation? They’re both important issues but they’re two different issues.

Look, you can call yourself whatever you want but it won’t change the fact that when you buy meat/dairy/eggs you’re supporting an industry that runs off of the exploitation of the female reproductive system. It’s as simple as that. And yeah, not everyone can be 100% vegan because of their location/finance/health but that does not make animal exploitation any less cruel/ unnecessary. I’m not trying to say that I’d rather you starve if you can’t afford to eat vegan all the time… but that everyone should make a honest effort (if their situation permits) or at least acknowledge that the meat/dairy industry is fucked up.

lucidstrike:

Transcript:
I AM NOT TRAYVON MARTIN.
I AM NOT TROY DAVIS.

and to the middle class, white, socially concerned activist who wears a shirt emblazoned with those slogans, you are wrong.

I know you wear that shirt to stand in solidarity with Trayvon, Troy, and other victims of injustice. The purpose of those shirts is to humanize these victims of our society, by likening them to the middle class white activist wearing it. And once we’ve humanized the victims, this proves to us the arbitrariness of their deaths and thereby the injustice at play.

But the fact of the matter is that these men’s deaths are anything but arbitrary. The fact that the real Troy Davis and Trayvon Martin and countless other victims of oppression are buried under 6 feet of cold dirt while we middle class white activists are alive, marching, and wearing their names is an indication that our societal system is working exactly as it’s intended.

A more accurate t-shirt to display on my white body would be “I AM GEORGE ZIMMERMAN.” Zimmerman and I were indoctrinated in the same American discourse where we learned that the “other,” particularly black men like Trayvon and Troy, were less human and were to be feared. Society taught me that as a little white girl, I must preserve my purity and goodness, and that the presence of young single males threatened it. Society taught me that being in the presence of a BLACK man compounds that threat exponentially. I have been taught that male, black, bodies are an immediate threat to my safety and the well being of society as a whole, and Zimmerman was taught the same damn thing. We’re all taught it.

I look at George Zimmerman and think, “there, but for the grace of god, go I.” Had it not been for a decent education, intense critical thinking, and some truly excellent parenting, I would never have questioned the societal norms that Zimmerman and I were both taught, and I would have ended up feeling his attack on Trayvon was justified, just as he did, and the state of Florida does.

If we are to affect real change in the wake of Trayvon’s murder, we have to realize this. Realizing that you more closely resemble a homicidal oppressive force than a helpless victim is a really uncomfortable thing to do. I know. But wanting to identify with the victim is weak, and immature when it is not an accurate representation of reality. Real change is affected when we own up to our actions, our privilege, and our complicity with the system that murdered Trayvon and countless others.

Us privileged activists have to realize just how easy it is to be Zimmerman, and work to change this. Subvert stereotypes. Make it harder for others to buy into the bullshit that we’re fed our whole lives about race, class, gender, and other people by identifying and critiquing these messed up norms. Force adults to confront these norms, and raise children without indoctrinating them with the same old bullshit. Use your privilege to actively dismantle this messed up system. Listen to marginalized people like Trayvon’s family and Troy’s family and insure them access to the discourse. Listen to them, stand in solidarity with them. But do not, I repeat, DO NOT claim to be them.

becausewemustdotorg:

We only feel comfortable bringing up lynching and the Holocaust and epidemic gender and sexual violence because they are easy tools to appropriate. It’s easy to be against them, but not so easy to understand the specific conditions that support them, or the implicit attitudes that continue to inform them even in people with the best intentions. It’s not a fair comparison not because nonhumans don’t suffer, but because erasure of difference is not taken seriously and that does significant damage.”

"Solidarity does not require us all to be the same. By definition, it implies there is some piece that is inviolable, unique, and worth appreciating from a perspective that will never fully understand its effects or implications. We have the vision of building better coalitions when we rely on true solidarity, rather than doing what’s been done by the very oppressive structures we criticize.

Oppression of nonhumans has a history and quality that is all its own. We do a disservice to the nonhumans we advocate for when we erase their specific experiences in order to hang them on the scaffolding of human experience. We imply that the only meaningful way to talk about pain and suffering is through human terms, and then only those human terms we feel okay with constantly appropriating and co-opting. This is not a good framework for the non-speciesist society we wish to envision.”

navigatethestream:

{Its been a year since i started this blog, and subsequently went vegan. I have grown out of the conservative shell i was born into, and evolved into a more radical human being. I’ve changed so much i’m pretty sure my parents don’t recognize me, and i’m surprised they put up with my ultra…

kreeli:

Attention vegans, locavores, food justice activists, etc. Please read about Ellyn Satter’s Hierarchy of Food Needs. Internalize it. Be mindful of the privilege you espouse when you judge others for their choices.

kreeli:

Attention vegans, locavores, food justice activists, etc. Please read about Ellyn Satter’s Hierarchy of Food Needs. Internalize it. Be mindful of the privilege you espouse when you judge others for their choices.

stfuconservatives:

danceswithfaeriesunderthemoon:

littlegoldenapple:

gods-save-anonymous:

risingkraken:

wtfwhiteprivilege:

ricksantorum-2012:

Say NO to white guilt! 


You must be new.

I wonder what the OP would taste like with BBQ sauce?
Wait, they probably wouldn’t pass the food standards.

Goodness.

SPECIAL SNOWFLAKE ALERT



This post inherently acknowledges the existence of privilege. No one’s asking you to fucking apologize, we’re asking you to be aware of it and not use it to oppress others. COOL STORY ABOUT YOUR BORING LIFE BRO.

stfuconservatives:

danceswithfaeriesunderthemoon:

littlegoldenapple:

gods-save-anonymous:

risingkraken:

wtfwhiteprivilege:

ricksantorum-2012:

Say NO to white guilt! 

You must be new.

I wonder what the OP would taste like with BBQ sauce?

Wait, they probably wouldn’t pass the food standards.

Goodness.

SPECIAL SNOWFLAKE ALERT

This post inherently acknowledges the existence of privilege. No one’s asking you to fucking apologize, we’re asking you to be aware of it and not use it to oppress others. COOL STORY ABOUT YOUR BORING LIFE BRO.

feministdisney:

landoflewis:

If women were really paid so much less for the same job as men, wouldn’t companies hire just women to maximize profits?

You’re all suffering from a victim complex. Get off your overly entitled high horse and make a living.

women v. men is not the only…

abellandapomegranate:

blackamazon:

you either create a world where we can compete and thrive and live and prosper on an EQUITABLE level

or this entire thing goes up in smoke

YOu get to be a person of your own determination in a sustaining world

or Special and privileged in a dying…

connerxvx:

socialuprooting:

from Earth First! Newswire

Spread this.

miseengarde:

have you noticed the people who say “LOL STAWP GETTING OFFENDED OVER EVERYTHING!!”

are usually white, able-bodied, middle/upper-class heterosexual people?

who do not face any racism, ableism, classism, or homophobia?

who are not discriminated on a daily basis and have none of the experiences of oppressed populations?

who have no place policing the reactions of those who are systematically oppressed?

Peter Gelderloos, a self-identified anarchist and author of How Nonviolence Protects the State (South End Press, 2007), claims that veganism is a consumer activity. His arguments are a combination of ignorance and problematic assertions. There really isn’t much point in responding to Gelderloos claims about “veganism” since he presents absolutely no understanding of veganism, but I’ll do it anyway.

Gelderloos starts out by misrepresenting veganism as simply “a consumer activity. It is ultimately an attempt to change capitalism and human civilization through the exercise of one’s privileges as a consumer.” From there he goes on to argue how this is “an impossible approach.” Gelderloos even goes as far as to claim that veganism is not a lifestyle because a lifestyle is not a consumer choice.

I suppose Gelderloos may have just opened up a dictionary and read “vegan: a vegetarian who omits all animal products from the diet.” But this definition is not how vegans, at least not those with a historical understanding of the vegan movement, define themselves.

Had Gelderloos actually attempted to understand veganism he might have known that veganism is actually a philosophy of non-exploitation that applies to the societal level, and that this leads to a way of life (or lifestyle) that is based on noncooperation with, and divestment from, exploitation. Specifically with regard to the oppression of other animals, human animals are the agents of exploitation (or privileged group) and nonhuman animals are the targets of exploitation (or oppressed group). Veganism is about actively addressing this relationship of oppression. Vegans, as the agents, work to create equity and liberation by eliminating their privilege from the exploitation that targets and oppresses other animals.

I’m sure Gelderloos would disagree if I wrote: “Anarchism is a individualist lifestyle. It is ultimately an attempt to change capitalism and human civilization through the exercise of one’s privileges as an independent, self-interested individual. This is an impossible approach.” But this is basically the equivalent of Gelderloos ahistorical, asocial, and apolitical assessment of veganism.

Of course, as a human, Gelderloos is also an agent of the oppression of nonhuman animals. His attacks on veganism are meant, whether conscious or not, to perpetuate the oppression that makes other animals the target of exploitation. For instance, Gelderloos claims “Humans have evolved as omnivores” as an appeal to nature, which in effect masks other animals oppression as “natural.”

Saying something is “natural” is a convenient way to hide ideological assumptions. By claiming something is natural, Gelderloos can ignore all social, historical, moral, and political context. Naturalistic claims like this are used to justify just about every other form of oppression. In fact, evolutionary theory and capitalism have an interrelated and interconnected history, both informing and helping to refine the other. The capitalist theory that individuals are self-interested helped Darwin develop his evolutionary theory, which was then in turn used by social Darwinists to justify the capitalist system. Perhaps Gelderloos would subscribe to Peter Singer’s* “Darwinian Left” theory which claims male dominance is part of human evolution, thus putting both veganism and feminism in the category of being unnatural, and thus “impossible approaches” to addressing oppression.

Other problematic aspects of Gelderloos anti-veganism arguments include the romantic objectification of non-industrial, non-Western cultures. Gelderloos takes his romanticism as the model for a new society. In doing so Gelderloos ignores the historical, political, and social context of those other cultures, as well as the historical, political, and social context of the existing society. Gelderloos claims that since pre-capitalist societies exploited other animals and were “eco-harmonious,” that means a post-capitalist society, in order to be “eco-harmonious,” ought to exploit other animals as well. Like the appeal to nature, this argument fails for many of the same reasons, especially since it ignores all appropriate contexts. Regardless, since it flows from the evolutionary claim it is bound to fail anyway.

Gelderloos claims, “Stripping [veganism] of its moral universality, we can better evaluate its appropriateness, if an honest evaluation is what we actually desire.” Obviously an honest evaluation is not what Gelderloos seems to desire. Just as he used evolution to strip exploitation of its ideological context, and then used his romanticism of other cultures to strip exploitation of the historical, social, and cultural context, he then claims that “an honest evaluation” can come from viewing veganism as lacking moral context.

Using the enhanced misrepresentation of veganism as an amoral “consumer activity,” Gelderloos misidentifies veganism as a “boycott.” As I already pointed out, veganism is about liberation, not consumption. So when a vegan abnegates the products of exploitation, they are giving up privilege, as opposed to engaging in a “boycott.” If anything, Gelderloos’s ultimate inability to classify veganism as a boycott only serves to illustrate how veganism is not a consumer activity.

Gelderloos seems to believe that a plant-based diet is a privileged diet, conveniently ignoring that the privileged in fact consume a heavily animal-based diet. (Not to mention that consuming the products of other animals is privilege.) He also making outlandish, but conveniently unsupported, claims that veganism, if universal adopted by the Global North, would naturally lead to environmental disaster. Others have, with actual support cited, made the opposite claim, stating that a total plant-based diet is “the only ethical response to what is arguably the world’s most urgent social justice issue.”

Given that Gelderloos doesn’t understand veganism, it is not surprising that he seems to have a very strong and negative prejudice against vegans and that he engages in stereotyping vegans as self-righteous “missionaries.” (Calling out any form of oppression, whether through words or deeds, can get someone labeled “self-righteous.” It is a common epithet used by those with privilege to describe those who challenge their privilege.) One could just as easily argue that anarchists are self-centered individualists. Yet, like Gelderloos’s stereotype of vegans, such characterizations fail because, just like self-righteousness is not inherent to veganism, self-centeredness (one would hope) is not inherent to anarchism.

(* Important Note: In spite of popular belief, Peter Singer is not a vegan. Singer does not practice veganism, nor does he support the vegan movement. Whatever Singer’s concept of “animal liberation” is, he doesn’t oppose the social oppression of other animals. Singer believes that humans can continue to privilege themselves by targeting other animals for exploitation. For instance, in an interview with The Vegan, The Vegan Society magazine, Singer gives his endorsement for “a world in which people mostly eat plant foods, but occasionally treat themselves to the luxury of free range eggs, or possibly even meat from animals who live good lives under conditions natural for their species, and are then humanely killed on the farm.”)

what i said: you have white privilege
what they think i said: you have never dealt with any kind of hardship whatsoever and you are not oppressed in any way and you are a horrible person who is not deserving of love or happiness
We’ve heard the 911 calls. We seen the 13 year old witness. We’ve read the letter from the alleged [sic] killer’s father. We listened to the anger of the family’s attorney. We’ve felt the pain of Trayvon’s mother. For heaven’s sake, for 24 hours he was a deceased John Doe at the hospital because even the police couldn’t believe that maybe he LIVES in the community. There are still some facts to figure out. There are still some questions to be answered. But, let’s be clear. Let’s be very, very clear. Before the neighborhood watch captain, George Zimmerman, started following him against the better judgement of the 911 dispatcher. Before any altercation. Before any self-defense claim. Before Travyon’s cries for help were heard on the 911 tapes. Before the bullet hit him dead in the chest. Before all of this. He was suspicious. He was suspicious. Suspicious. And you know, like I know, it wasn’t because of the hoodie or the jeans or the sneakers. Cause I had on that same outfit yesterday and no one called 911 saying I was just wandering around their neighborhood. It was because of one thing and one thing only. Trayvon is black.

velocicrafter:

REALLY fucking telling, that nary a vegan who went vegan “because animals can’t speak for themselves” or whatever, not one of them has even attempted to explain how this decision & this reasoning can be reconciled with the fact that HUMAN fucking BEINGS who work in the industry that provides…

I actually am not a huge fan of the “voice of the voiceless” narrative, since the so-called “voiceless” are rarely without a voice, but are silenced by their oppressors in the first place (and thus need to be amplified rather than suppressed), but that’s a whole different topic. 

There are vegans who acknowledge that human rights abuses occur in the food industry (ahem, including the animal-using industries! e.g. factory farms, slaughterhouses, etc.), including prominent outspoken vegans like Lauren Ornelas and Melanie Joy, and vegan sites such as Because We Must, L.O.V.E., The Vegan Ideal, and Animal Rights & AntiOppression.

Sure, vegans must be aware of human injustices as well, and by that same token, social justice advocates need to cut the anthropocentric crap, and become more aware and critical of nonhuman injustices. Human and nonhuman rights are both valid; there is no need to place some arbitrary emphasis on either one, and in fact, both need fostering in order to achieve true justice. I don’t see many nonvegans being aware of or critical of human OR nonhuman cruelty in industries, yet vegans are held to some higher standard for whatever fucking reason. More mindfulness would be nice on both ends. Because while I don’t take vegans seriously when they are apathetic to human rights causes, I am every bit as cynical when it comes to the social justice advocates who are apathetic to nonhuman rights causes.

Lastly, vegans shouldn’t be supportive of human causes because concern for human justice is some moral default that takes precedence over everything else, but because all injustices are connected, and all injustices are wrong, be the victims human or nonhuman (and humans are indeed animals).  

The following presentation is an introduction to anti-oppression veganism. The first half covers animal rights, animal welfare, and how the two relate to anti-speciesism and vegetarianism. The second half covers the basics of anti-oppression veganism.