fracturedrefuge:

Wanna show your support for people with autism but can’t find anything that isn’t dripping with puzzle pieces or that benefits Autism $peaks?
Well, fear not! The good folks over at ThinkGeek have you covered! They have partnered with the Autistic Self Advocacy Network (ASAN) - an autism advocacy group run by autistic people, for autistic people - to bring you this awesome Neurodiversity shirt.  The best part?  100% of the proceeds go to ASAN!
So check it out!  I know I am getting one. <3

fracturedrefuge:

Wanna show your support for people with autism but can’t find anything that isn’t dripping with puzzle pieces or that benefits Autism $peaks?

Well, fear not! The good folks over at ThinkGeek have you covered! They have partnered with the Autistic Self Advocacy Network (ASAN) - an autism advocacy group run by autistic people, for autistic people - to bring you this awesome Neurodiversity shirt.  The best part?  100% of the proceeds go to ASAN!

So check it out!  I know I am getting one. <3

goldenheartedrose:

allies-person:

This very smart person is my husband, folks.

I love so many things about this post.

Many autism organizations are celebrating April as Autism Awareness Month. But others, especially those in which autistic people have a say, are celebrating Autism Acceptance Month instead. Why?

Because Autism Awareness doesn’t really help autistic people in general, and kids like my son Leo specifically. It makes it too easy for well-meaning people to feel they are “doing something” about autism if they wear a blue ribbon or buy a blue light bulb — when neither of those actions translate to real-world benefits and support for autistics and autism families. Autism Awareness campaigns let people look at pictures of kids like my sweet Leo (riding his bike in the photo), and say “awww” or “bless his heart” while still considering him as a statistic, a number in an “epidemic” (autism is not a disease), a burden to society.

Read more

goldenheartedrose:

Because it needs to be said.

aspiealligator:

sistercrow:

tide-and-wave:

aspiealligator:

Doesn’t matter who you are (autistic or not!) — we want your opinion on curing autism!

Please remember to reblog/rebagel so we can get more data….for science!

Just did this! I kinda wanna spread this around…

Me too.  I found some of the language to be incredibly problematic, but it is the kind of problematic language that people actually use when talking to autistic people, and the poll was clearly intentionally designed to reflect those kind of attitudes without endorsing them over others.

Bingo! Trying to see which way people lean!

the funny thing about NTs, is they love aspies in books and movies but in real life treat them like they need a “cure.”

anaimia:

Just thought you should know.

I’m not a fucking cancer, I don’t need to be cured.

I like being alone.

I like it.

I don’t like being bothered.

I would like to actually PLAN when someone is going to talk to me, or do it on my own terms.

It bothers me that you create these characters that have aspergers, and adore them, but when you run across us in real life you have this stupid and apparently sudden realization that it’s only okay to be a “freak” in fiction.

goldenheartedrose:

annieelainey:

Hello, everyone! I’m taking the time to make this post today because Autism Counts Inc. really needs your help!

Autism Counts is in it’s early stages as a non-profit and it’s been quite the muddy climb. As many of you know, my sister, my best friend; Emi, she has moderate/classic autism and she is 20 years old. She inspired this project. We have found that when people with classic/moderate autism have completed school, many of them have to stay home because most social environments do not accommodate to their sensory needs (occasional heightened sense of sight, hearing, and touch) or to their autistic symptoms (anxiety, tantrums, spinning, rocking, etc).

The goal of Autism Counts is to raise enough money to create a local center that accommodates to their needs; it will include an art studio, a sensory room, and a store with educational materials (examples above). Our long-term hope is for the centers to expand, become similar to community centers, but they will embrace and accommodate to people with special needs, as opposed to reprimand and expel. There is no such center in existence and it is desperately needed.

PLEASE SHOW YOUR SUPPORT!! THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT. The people working on this are starting to lose hope, people need to see that people care. 

Now THIS is something I could get behind.  My daughter came up to the computer when I pulled this up and she went “cooooool”.  She’s almost 6.  I share her sentiments there.  

SO MANY PRETTY LIGHTS. 

p-3a:

List of Female Asperger Syndrome Traits
from http://www.help4aspergers.com
Language in transcript changed by p-3a.tumblr.com to be less cis- and hetero-centric. “Male” and “female”, as left, refer to sex, not gender. Appearance/personal habits:
Dresses comfortably due to sensory issues and practicality
Will not spend much time on grooming and hair. Hairstyles have to be “wash and wear”. Can be quite happy not grooming at all at times.
Eccentric personality; may be reflected in appearance
Is youthful for their age, in looks, dress, behaviour and tastes.
Usually a little more expressive in face and gesture than male counterparts
May have many androgynous traits, possibly despite an outwardly feminine appearance. Thinks of themself as half-male/half-female. (well-balanced anima/animus)
May not have a strong sense of identity, and can be very chameleon-like, especially before diagnosis.
Enjoys reading and films as a retreat, often sci-fi, fantasy, children’s, and can have favourites which are a refuge
Uses control as a stress management technique: rules, discipline, rigid in certain habits, which will contradict their seeming unconventionality.
Usually happiest at home or in other controlled environment.
Intellectual/giftedness/education/vocation:
May have been diagnosed as autistic or Asperger’s when young, or may have been thought of as gifted, shy, sensitive, etc… May also have had obvious or severe learning deficits
Often musical, artistic
May have a savant skill or strong talent(s)
May have a strong interest in computers, games, science, graphic design, inventing, things of a technological and visual nature. More verbal thinkers may gravitate to writing, languages, cultural
studies, psychology
May be a self-taught reader, been hyperlexic as a child, and will possess a wide variety of other self-taught skills as well
May be highly educated but will have had to struggle with social aspects of college. May have one or many partial degrees
Can be very passionate about a course of study or job, and then change direction or go completely cold on it very quickly
Will often have trouble holding onto a job and may find employment daunting
Highly intelligent, yet sometimes can be slow to comprehend due to sensory and cognitive processing issues
Will not do well with verbal instructions - needs to write down or draw diagram
Will have obsessions but they are not as unusual as their male counterpart’s (less likely to be a “train-spotter”)
Emotional/physical:
Emotionally immature and emotionally sensitive
Anxiety and fear are predominant emotions
More open to talking about feelings and emotional issues than males with AS
Strong sensory issues - sounds, sights, smells, touch, and prone to overload. (Less likely to have taste/food texture issues than males)
Moody and prone to bouts of depression. May have been diagnosed as bi-polar or manic depressive (common comorbids of autism/AS) while the AS diagnosis was missed
Probably given several different prescriptions to treat symptoms. Will be very sensitive to medications and anything else thei puts in their body so may have had adverse reactions
9 out of 10 have mild to severe Gastro-intestinal difficulties—e.g. ulcers, acid reflux, IBS, etc.
Stims to soothe when sad or agitated: rocking, face-rubbing, humming, finger flicking, leg bouncing, finger or foot-tapping, etc.
Similarly physical when happy: hand-flapping, clapping, singing, jumping, running around, dancing, bouncing
Prone to temper or crying meltdowns, even in public, sometimes over seemingly small things due to sensory or emotional overload.
Hates injustice and hates to be misunderstood; this can incite anger and rage.
Prone to mutism when stressed or upset, esp. after a meltdown. Less likely to stutter than male counterparts but may have a raspy voice, monotone at times, when stressed or sad.
Social/relationships:
Words and actions are often misunderstood by others
Perceived to be cold-natured and self-centered; unfriendly
Is very outspoken at times, may get fired up when talking about passions/obsessive interests
Can be very shy or mute
Like their male counterpart, will shut down in social situations once overloaded, but is generally better at socialising in small doses. May even give the appearance of skilled, but it is a ‘performance’
Doesn’t go out much. Will prefer to go out with partner only or children if she has them
If identifying as a woman, will not have many girlfriends and will not do “girly” things like shopping with them or have get-togethers to “hang out”
Will have a close friend or friends in school, but not once adulthood is reached
May or may not want to have a relationship. If they are in a relationship, they probably take it very seriously but they may prefer to remain celibate or alone
Due to sensory issues, will either really enjoy sex or strongly dislike it
If they identify as female and they like a man, she can be extremely, noticeable awkward in her attempts to let him know, e.g. she may stare when she sees him or call him repeatedly. This is because she fixates and doesn’t understand societal gender roles. This may change with maturity.
Often prefers the company of animals but not always due to sensory issues

Story of my life. :P

p-3a:

List of Female Asperger Syndrome Traits

from http://www.help4aspergers.com

Language in transcript changed by p-3a.tumblr.com to be less cis- and hetero-centric. “Male” and “female”, as left, refer to sex, not gender.

Appearance/personal habits:

Dresses comfortably due to sensory issues and practicality

Will not spend much time on grooming and hair. Hairstyles have to be “wash and wear”. Can be quite happy not grooming at all at times.

Eccentric personality; may be reflected in appearance

Is youthful for their age, in looks, dress, behaviour and tastes.

Usually a little more expressive in face and gesture than male counterparts

May have many androgynous traits, possibly despite an outwardly feminine appearance. Thinks of themself as half-male/half-female. (well-balanced anima/animus)

May not have a strong sense of identity, and can be very chameleon-like, especially before diagnosis.

Enjoys reading and films as a retreat, often sci-fi, fantasy, children’s, and can have favourites which are a refuge

Uses control as a stress management technique: rules, discipline, rigid in certain habits, which will contradict their seeming unconventionality.

Usually happiest at home or in other controlled environment.


Intellectual/giftedness/education/vocation:

May have been diagnosed as autistic or Asperger’s when young, or may have been thought of as gifted, shy, sensitive, etc… May also have had obvious or severe learning deficits

Often musical, artistic

May have a savant skill or strong talent(s)

May have a strong interest in computers, games, science, graphic design, inventing, things of a technological and visual nature. More verbal thinkers may gravitate to writing, languages, cultural

studies, psychology

May be a self-taught reader, been hyperlexic as a child, and will possess a wide variety of other self-taught skills as well

May be highly educated but will have had to struggle with social aspects of college. May have one or many partial degrees

Can be very passionate about a course of study or job, and then change direction or go completely cold on it very quickly

Will often have trouble holding onto a job and may find employment daunting

Highly intelligent, yet sometimes can be slow to comprehend due to sensory and cognitive processing issues

Will not do well with verbal instructions - needs to write down or draw diagram

Will have obsessions but they are not as unusual as their male counterpart’s (less likely to be a “train-spotter”)


Emotional/physical:

Emotionally immature and emotionally sensitive

Anxiety and fear are predominant emotions

More open to talking about feelings and emotional issues than males with AS

Strong sensory issues - sounds, sights, smells, touch, and prone to overload. (Less likely to have taste/food texture issues than males)

Moody and prone to bouts of depression. May have been diagnosed as bi-polar or manic depressive (common comorbids of autism/AS) while the AS diagnosis was missed

Probably given several different prescriptions to treat symptoms. Will be very sensitive to medications and anything else thei puts in their body so may have had adverse reactions

9 out of 10 have mild to severe Gastro-intestinal difficulties—e.g. ulcers, acid reflux, IBS, etc.

Stims to soothe when sad or agitated: rocking, face-rubbing, humming, finger flicking, leg bouncing, finger or foot-tapping, etc.

Similarly physical when happy: hand-flapping, clapping, singing, jumping, running around, dancing, bouncing

Prone to temper or crying meltdowns, even in public, sometimes over seemingly small things due to sensory or emotional overload.

Hates injustice and hates to be misunderstood; this can incite anger and rage.

Prone to mutism when stressed or upset, esp. after a meltdown. Less likely to stutter than male counterparts but may have a raspy voice, monotone at times, when stressed or sad.


Social/relationships:

Words and actions are often misunderstood by others

Perceived to be cold-natured and self-centered; unfriendly

Is very outspoken at times, may get fired up when talking about passions/obsessive interests

Can be very shy or mute

Like their male counterpart, will shut down in social situations once overloaded, but is generally better at socialising in small doses. May even give the appearance of skilled, but it is a ‘performance’

Doesn’t go out much. Will prefer to go out with partner only or children if she has them

If identifying as a woman, will not have many girlfriends and will not do “girly” things like shopping with them or have get-togethers to “hang out”

Will have a close friend or friends in school, but not once adulthood is reached

May or may not want to have a relationship. If they are in a relationship, they probably take it very seriously but they may prefer to remain celibate or alone

Due to sensory issues, will either really enjoy sex or strongly dislike it

If they identify as female and they like a man, she can be extremely, noticeable awkward in her attempts to let him know, e.g. she may stare when she sees him or call him repeatedly. This is because she fixates and doesn’t understand societal gender roles. This may change with maturity.

Often prefers the company of animals but not always due to sensory issues

Story of my life. :P

Reblog if you’re an LGBTQ+ autistic.
Let’s get this straight: Overcompensation is not an indicator of normalcy. It’s an indicator of disability. And the oddest part of a distinctively odd life is that many of us have been disabled from birth without knowing it because we were so good at overcompensating. We are rarely talked about in disability circles, where one hears of two separate groups: Those who were born disabled, and those who became disabled as the result of illness or injury. Always in these representations, those who were born disabled tend to have an easier time with disability identity than those who became disabled later on and have to deal with the disjunction of past and present selves. But where do we late-diagnosed folks fit into this rendering? We are disabled from birth, but we didn’t know it until later. And because we didn’t know it all those years, and just lived our lives overcompensating with every breath, we are told that we are not disabled now and that we never were.
Rachel Cohen-Rottenberg, On Passing, Overcompensating, and Disability at Journeys with Autism
I want people to start using “Your autism” is showing as a compliment with me.

aspergersmomof2:

I absolutely love this! 

deaf-aspie:

“My, what an interesting arrangement! Your autism must be showing!”

“What a well-though out essay! You covered all the points! Your autism is showing!”

“You’re a self-taught pianist? Your autism must is showing!”

“You do research in biochemistry AND encryption? Your autism must be showing!”